December 14, 2017

Golf Swing Instructions: How Golf Has Changed Since The Palmer-Nicklaus Era

golf swing tipsGolf swing instructions to teach golfers how to hit straight golf shots have fundamentally changed since the Palmer-Nicklaus days.

During the Palmer-Nicklaus golfing era, most golf swing instructions suggested golfers to work the ball either to the right or to the left of the target.

The reason why golfers tended to work the ball more in the Palmer-Nicklaus era was that it was more difficult to hit the golf ball straight in the earlier days of golf, according to some of the Legends of the times.

Indeed, I recently heard Jack Nicklaus discuss on the Golf Channel the difficulty of  hitting straight golf shots during the 60′s and 70′s.

He felt that the equipment at the time was not conductive  to hit straight golf shots.

Another handicap in those days was caused by golfers wearing spiked shoes, in comparison with golf shoes of today.

Most golfers nowadays move their feet to change their stance in order to align their shoulders parallel with their target lines.

It is much more difficult to move your feet and change your stance when wearing spiked golf shoes.

Another change aside from better equipment and spiked shoes is the condition of the golf courses on which professional golfers play these days.

Another improvement is that of better yardage markers now in compariosn with a lack of them in the earlier days.

However, in terms of being unable to fly rhe ball straight in the earlier days, as contended by some of the greats of that era and blaming it on the earlier equipment, I take issue.

I believe that the golfers in the Palmer-Nicklaus era could have hit the ball as straight as golfers of today had they done three simple things, regardless of the earlier equipment.

One, had they simply aligned their shoulders parallel with the target line with the sweet spot of the ball centered as near as possible to the back of the ball at the completion of their setup proceedings.

Two, had they kept their left heel firmly planted throughout the swing as most professional golfers do these days.

Three, had they maintained eye contact with the ball from the beginning of the swing through impact with the ball.

Had golfers simply applied these three disciplines in the earlier days they would have been able to produce straight golf shots at will,  because these are some of the golf swing instructions that are so prevalent these days.

Copyright © 2012 by Gordon Jackson…all rights reserved driving a golf ball straight everytime

 

 

 

 

 

Tips On Golf Swing: The Difference Between The Conventional And Locked-In Draw

 http://lockedingolf.com/golftips/2011/golf-draw-shot Some major tips on golf swing is to understand the difference between the conventional way to produce a draw and the Locked-In method of hitting  a draw.

Several draw techniques can be found at http://how-to-hit-a-draw.com/ .

There is a huge difference between the techniques shown at http://how-to-hit-a-draw.com/  to produce Locked-In draw shots than what is required to hit a conventional type of draw.

As discussed and shown at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhjmZKeQigc , the locked-in golf method to produce a draw is markedly different from the conventional way to produce draw golf shots.

The traditional means to produce a draw is to align your body to the outside of your target line, the imaginary line running from your target back to and through your ball.

Then the traditional way requires you to swing your club back along your body line during your back swing and down your target line during your down swing.

However, as discussed in some of the golf articles at  http://www.articles-on-golf.com/2012/hit-a-draw-how-t  the difficulty of producing a draw the conventional way is that if you swing too much to the outside of your body line during your back swing you could become the victim of the “double cross” and produce a push that would fly in the oposite direction of a draw.

I discuss this dilemma  in a book entitled, How To Hit A Power Draw, which is available at http://lockedingolf.com/golftechniques/book/how-to-hit-a-power-draw/ .

The Locked-n method to produce draw ball flights, on the other hand, requires you lock-in a draw ball flight alignment during your set up routine, center the sweet spot of your club face directly behind your ball and then align your shoulders parallel with your directional line, the imaginary line on which you want your ball initially to fly so it will curve to the target as a result of its draw alignment.

Then, with the Locked-In approach, all that remains is to keep a steady head and execute a simple golf swing without any manipulation of the club during the golf swing in any manner.

Discounting windy condition or elevation differentials between your stance and your ball, you should produce a draw, one shot after another.

Unlike the susceptibility of the conventional method to the double-cross dilemma, the Locked-In draw alignment during the set up proceeding  avoids any possibility  of this malady.

So, once again, one of the best tips on golf swing is to appreciate the difference in these two approaches to produce draw golf shots.

Copyright © 2012 by Gordon Jackson    http://shapinggolfshots.com/topgolfshots/golfdraw/instructions-golf-swin/

 

 

 

 

TIPS FOR GOLF SWING: THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A TARGET LINE AND A DIRECTIONAL LINE

how to drive a golf ball straightOne of the best tips for golf swing is to know the difference between what is referred to as a target line and is referred to as a directional line.

The reason why this is one of the best tips for golf swing is if you align your shoulders parallel with the wrong line you could severely mishit your golf shot. Instead of hitting straight golf shots you would mishit your ball.

If you want to improve your golf swing, you must know whether to align your shoulders parallel with your target line or align your shoulders parallel with your directional line at the completion of your setup proceedings.

Most golf swing instructions characterize the target line as the imaginary line that runs from the target back to and through the ball.

On the other hand, the directional line can best be described as the imaginary line on which you want your ball to fly initially.

For example, if you were faced with a right-to-left cross wind you would need to align your shoulders parallel with an imaginary directional line to the outside of your target line on which you would want your ball to fly initially to adjust for the wind condition.

Assuming you aligned your shoulders perfectly parallel with an imaginary directional line to the outside of your target line to adjust for a right-to-left cross wind in such instance, your ball eventually should fly to the target.

However, if you were faced with a left-to-right cross wind you would need to align your shoulders parallel with an imaginary directional line to the inside of the target line on which you would want your ball to fly initially to adjust for the wind condition.

Again, assuming you aligned your shoulders perfectly parallel with an imaginary directional line to the inside of your target line to adjust for the wind condition in such instance, your ball eventually should fly to the target.

You also need to align your shoulders parallel with an imaginary directional line instead of with the target line when faced with a slice or hook ball lie.

For example, if faced with a hook lie you would need to align your shoulders parallel with an imaginary directional line to the outside of your target line to adjust for the ball tending to curve to the left.

If aligned correctly in such instance, your ball eventually should fly to your target.

Likewise, if faced with a slice lie you would need to align your shoulders parallel with an imaginary directional line to the inside of your target line to adjust for the ball tending to curve to the right.

Again, if aligned accurately in such instance, your ball eventually should fly to the target.

However in the absence of cross-winds or an unlevel lie of your ball, you would want to align your shoulders parallel with your target line at the completion of your setup routine.

Then, if you have locked-in a straight ball flight alignment by performing one of the techniques featured at LockedInGolf.com, have your clubface centered as near as possible to the back of your ball at final address, keep a steady head, planted left heel and execute a balanced golf swing, your ball should fly as straight-as-an-arrow directly to your target.

Once you understand when to align your shoulders parallel with your target line or, when to align your shoulders parallel with your target line, you should then agree this to be one of the best tips for golf swing you will ever receive.improve your golf swing

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson –-all rights reserved

 

 

GOLF SWING TIPS: PUTT TO 18 INCHES PAST THE CUP IF NOT INTO IT

One of the best swing tips ever uttered is that of Dave Pelz: putt to 18 inches past the cup if not into it.

The obvious reason why this is one of the best golf swing tips ever given is the ball cannot go into the cup if it never gets to it.

Tom Watson was a very good putter during his earlier career, not that he necessarily putted all that well in terms of accuracy, but he rarely left a putt short of the cup. Had he not putted in this manner he would not have won as many majors.

However,  I think there is one exception to Dave Pelz’s golf putting tips.

It is this.

If putting extremely uphill, it may not be wise to putt too far beyond the hole in the event the putt misses the cup.

It is much easier to hit a putt uphill when left short of the cup rather than above the hole because, as Arnold Palmer would advise, the cup can be used as a back stop for uphill putts but not very well for downhill putts.

Ben Hogan, who had the “yips” later in his career, once remarked when he missed a very short downhill putt, that he never intended to leave himself a downhill putt when he hit his approach shot to the green.

Nowadays, many instructors teach golfers intentionally to “lag putt,” meaning to leave a putt short of the cup, especially a long putt.

Lag putting may be beneficial in saving a par or bogie but it does not portend too well for making birdies.

All in all, Dave Pelz’s advice on this issue is still one of the best golf swing tips ever given.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson –All Rights Reserved

Tips On Golf Swing: Use The Bodacious Pull Technique To Hit An Ideal Pull Shot

tips on golf swingIf you wish to avoid trouble on your right you should find the Bodacious Pull Technique™ as  one of the best tips on golf swing.

 It indeed is one of the best tips on golf swing ever because it is designed to pull the ball to the left and away from any such hazard or trouble to the right.

 This assumes you are right handed. If left-handed, it would pull your ball to the right and away from any trouble or hazards to your left.

The Bodacious Pull Technique™ is one of many golf methods I have designed and developed  to hit a perfect pull golf shot.

A pull golf shot produces one of the best ball flights to the left of a fairway, perhaps even better than a draw or hook golf shot. The ball merely flies to the left and continues to the left, discounting wind conditions and elevation differences between your stance and your ball.

On the other hand, a draw or hook is subject to the “double-cross” that would cause your ball to fly into trouble or a hazard to the right.

So what are the golf swing instructions to perform the Bodacious Pull Technique™?

First, assume a comfortable stance and posture. Then ground the sole of your clubface in the middle of your stance.

Next, straighten both of your legs to the maximum and lock both of your knee joints. Keep your knee joints locked until the completion of the procedure.

Then, grip your left-hand (if right-handed) on your club in a traditional diagonal manner.

Next and the most critical step, lower your shoulders while the sole of your clubface remains on the surface and until it stops rotating.

Maintain your position and then grip your right hand on your club in a conventional manner, either with an overlapping, interlocking  or baseball (ten fingers) style of grip.

Then, complete your grip by locking (docking) the lifeline of your right hand squarely and securely on your left thumb.

Next, unlock the lifeline of your right hand at least one-inch from your left thumb without completely un-gripping your club. Then re-lock the lifeline of your right hand squarely and securely on your left thumb.

You must not unlock the lifeline of your right hand from your left thumb thereafter. If you do, this technique will not produce an ideal pull shot.

Finally, unlock your knee joints and raise your shoulders to their original positions. At this point you should have a locked-in pull ball flight alignment.

It then just becomes a matter of assuming a comfortable stance and posture to your ball, if not already so assumed, centering the sweet spot of your clubface as near as possible to the back of your ball and aligning your shoulders parallel with your directional line, the imaginary line on which you want your ball to fly initially.

Then keep a steady head and execute a simple golf swing without attempting to manipulate your clubface in any manner.

If you follow these instructions precisely you then should observe your ball pulling perfectly to the left to avoid any trouble or hazard to the right.

It will provide the perfect golf swing if you have trouble on your right and, in turn, improve your golf and lower your scores.

In addition to avoiding trouble or hazards to the right, this type of pull golf shot is ideal when faced with cross-winds from the left.

It merely straightens the shot to the target. If you learn to use this technique correctly you too should agree it to be one of the best tips on golf swing ever designed to hit a perfect pull golf shot.

Copyright © 2011 by Gordon Jackson—All Rights Reserved.     golf methods